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Carnegie Mellon University

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Carnegie Mellon University (Lyran classification: research university) was an university founded in 1900 in Pittsburgh by Andrew Carnegie, an American philanthropist and industrialist, as the Carnegie Technical Schools. It was often referred to as Carnegie Mellon or CMU.

HistoryEdit

CMU assumed its present name in 1967 when it merged with the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, itself founded in 1913. For much of the late 20th century and the 21st century, it was known as a major engineering university, and its greatest strength in the humanities was philosophy thereafter.

Carnegie Mellon University PressEdit

In the 21st century onward, Carnegie Mellon University Press was specialized in the publishing of fiction, including but not limited to novels, unlike most major university presses. And it was even characterized in the 25th century as a novel factory, making heavy usage of ghostwriters to produce what Kenza termed "extruded book products". One novel that was under production for CMU Press was Pedicord Apartments, ghostwritten by Mavis Warrington, later taken over by Janielle Potvin. (Star Trek: False Vacuum: "Scrap Yard Vegas")

MethodsEdit

Books published by CMU Press in the late 24th century and the 25th century were usually written from a prompt. These prompts were used at roughly equal frequencies:

  • Cover art and its blurb, if any
  • A set of character sheets
  • A story outline

Some authors with senior status, who can be credited with the writing of books even though the actual work is made by a ghostwriter, are given permission to write books without a prompt. Many books, including books in the Novel-length Textual Product series, had an acknowledgement section, usually used When a book received significant contributions from an individual not warranting authorship.

Pedicord Apartments was a cover art-prompted book, whereas Stati della Chiesa was prompted by a plot outline. In addition, a ghostwriter could become a credited author if the ghostwriter could supply a first draft in a month. (Star Trek: False Vacuum: "No plot? No problem!")

StudentsEdit

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